Swimming Holes

To find Swimming Holes in the Texas Hill Country use the search form above and select "Swimming Holes" from the activity menu. Next select a distance and city and press the "SEARCH" button.

Cool, Clear, Water — Water

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The list of swimming holes we have compiled contains some of the best places in the Hill Country to seek refuge from the searing Texas heat. We have noted those locations that typically show up on the various Top Ten Lists of Swimming Holes that are published from time-to-time. Keep in mind that some of these locations also are swell spots for fishing, for wildlife viewing, or to use as a put in or take out spot for your kayak or tubing trips.

 

Of course our website has information for well-known locations such as Krause Springs and Hamilton Pool, but we also have included information for some places that we are confident will be new to you. Please note that a lot of the stream crossings typically are better used for play areas (wading, lawn chair immersion, or floating) rather than for swimming. That is why when you read our descriptions of crossings we often reference other nearby places where the conditions might be more favorable for swimming.  Also, if you are going to a private facility it always is a good idea to contact them before heading out for a visit so you can get the low down on what is and what is not allowed on their property.

 

For an additional resource regarding swimming holes and swimming pools in Central Texas, you should consider getting a copy of the book that is titled “Splash Across Texas”. That book is very informative and contains descriptions of many additional indoor and outdoor spots to take a dip. The “Austin Chronicle” website has some good information about swimming holes as well. Be sure to exercise caution at the swimming holes and crossings, they can be very slippery and otherwise fraught with peril. Sorry to sound like your mom, but don’t ever dive or jump into the water unless you are confident it is safe to do so. The last thing you want to do is smash your noggin on a submerged boulder — “Boom, boom, out go the lights”.

 

To Park or not to Park

Now for a word or two about parking, which can be a significant concern if you are not careful. You should strictly obey all traffic signs and if there is any doubt about whether parking is legal – do not park there. Getting towed in the middle of nowhere is anything but fun. If you are using any of these places as a put in or take out point for a kayak or tubing trip, make sure you will be comfortable with where you leave your vehicle for the several hours needed to complete your journey. It is always advisable to ask the folks at the local visitor center, nearby businesses, and area outfitters for parking tips. When practicable, try to find businesses, campgrounds or parks where you can leave your vehicles during your trip even if you need to pay a small fee. Doing so will help guard against break-ins and from being towed to a friendly storage facility miles and miles away (“Hope you brought enough cash to get your truck out Bud because we don’t accept plastic”).